A San Francisco fitness center slated to open this fall will motivate customers to use weed as part of their fitness routine.

Power Plant Fitness customers are going to have the choice to bring their own cannabis or order edibles, the gym’s preferable kind of cannabis, while they’re at the fitness center. Desired edibles will be brought by a delivery service to the fitness center within 15 minutes after customers place orders, said owner Jim McAlpine. Adult-use, recreational marijuana is legal in California, but it can be sold exclusively by dispensaries. Using marijuana in public is prohibited. The fitness center is going to have designated space for those inhaling pot.

The gym, which advertises itself as the world’s first cannabis fitness center, touts using the drug for meditation, focus and pain.

McAlpine, who’s already hosting Power Plant boot camps, wants people understand this isn’t going to be “a stoner gym.” The focus is still on fitness even if cannabis use is welcome.

“For the people that it affects the right way that was right, cannabis can make working out fun,” McAlpine said. “If you make it more fun, people are going to do it more.”

McAlpine said cannabis helps him control his weight and focus during workouts. But, he said this isn’t the situation for everybody.

When customers join the gym, McAlpine said they’ll undergo a cannabis performance evaluation. That means staff will evaluate customers during a sober workout as well as a workout after using cannabis.

McAlpine, who also founded the 420 Games, said he expects at least half of the customers won’t be an excellent fit for cannabis-influenced workouts.

“This isn’t something where we’re telling somebody to do this,” McAlpine said. “It’s an option to consider.”

Dr. Marc J. Romano, director of medical services at Delphi Behavioral Health in Florida, said people could feel more relaxed when using and working out. The World Anti-Doping Agency actually mentions research saying cannabis can give an edge to athletes by reducing stress, enabling users to perform better under pressure.

“If your awareness cognition is in any way impaired, you might be a risk to those around you,” Romano said.

Dr. Sue Sisley, who has ran FDA-approved clinical trails on cannabis and recently served on a panel at SXSW with McAlpine, said physicians have to be cynical.

“We’ve never been subjected to the concept of cannabis as medicine,” Sisley said. “We’ve been systematically misled.”

“Bottom line is the plant is really benign,” she said. “It has a very mild side effect profile. It’s far less toxic than many of the prescriptions I write every day.”